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Kanegan

Challenges Ernst Wilimowski Challenge

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Wilimowski.png.bb7d2b37f9c071eda511460d2039bd23.png

Ernest Willimowski (born Ernest Otto Prandella, nicknamed "Ezi") (23 June 1916 – 30 August 1997) was a German–Polish football player, who played as a forward. He ranks among the best goalscorers in the history of both the Poland national team and Polish club football. After re-taking German citizenship, he also played for the Germany national team. He was the first player to score four goals in a single FIFA World Cup game. Over the course of his career, he scored a total of 1,175 goals; though this tally is unverified and will include friendly and unofficial matches. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation credits Wilimowski with 554 official goals, making him the 14th-most prolific goalscorer in history. He also occasionally played ice hockey for the team Pogoń Katowice.

Willimowski, who had six toes on his right foot, played on the left side as a forward and showed himself to be a very skilled dribbler as well as a natural goalscorer. He began his career with the ethnically German club 1. FC Kattowitz, then in 1933 at the age of 17, moved to Polish side Ruch Wielkie Hajduki, today known as Ruch Chorzów. "Ezi" quickly established himself as the team's best player: in his first season he scored 33 goals to lead the league. His first Ekstraklasa game took place on 8 April 1934, a few weeks later, he capped for Polish national team. With a number of excellent footballers besides Willimowski (for example Teodor Peterek and Gerard Wodarz), Ruch dominated the Polish soccer and was the league champion in 1933–1936 and 1938. He played 86 games for Ruch, scoring 112 goals, and was the league's top scorer in 1934 and 1936. He also led the league in scoring in 1939 until the German invasion of Poland. On 21 May 1939, he scored 10 goals in a single match against Union Touring Łódź as his club won 12-1. That performance still stands as a league record.

Soon after beginning his club football career, "Ezi" earned his first cap for Poland when he debuted against Denmark in København on 21 May 1934 in a 2:4 loss: he was just 17 years and 332 days old. In a total of 22 appearances for Poland Willimowski netted 21 goals, nearly a goal per game. However, his off field conduct was less than ideal and in 1936 the young man's penchant for drinking and partying led to a one-year suspension imposed by the Polish football association just before the Olympic Games in Berlin. Without his goal scoring touch the Poles managed only a fourth-place finish in the Olympic tournament. Many felt that his presence could have brought the team a gold medal.

His appearances for Poland include two performances that were both historic and memorable. In a match against Brazil played in Strasbourg, France during the 1938 FIFA World Cup, "Ezi" put on a stunning display by becoming the first player ever to score four goals in a single World Cup match. His continued attacks on the opposition net also drew a penalty as he was fouled to the ground by Brazilian keeper Batatais, which led to Poland's fifth goal scored from the spot by German-born Fritz Scherfke, from Poznań. However, it was not enough - Poland lost the match 5-6 and was eliminated from the tournament. Willimowski's record was later equalled by other players, but was bettered only 56 years later, when Oleg Salenko scored five goals against Cameroon during the 1994 FIFA World Cup. It still remains the only World Cup match when a player from the losing side scored four goals. He put on another memorable display on 27 August 1939 in Warsaw in an international friendly against what was then one of the best teams in the world - Hungary, the 1938 World Cup runner-up. After 33 minutes of play the Hungarians were ahead 2:0. Willimowski scored three goals and again drew a penalty through his attacking play which was converted by teammate Leonard Piątek, giving Poland a 4:2 win. The match was the last game played before the start of World War II just four days later.

After the division of Poland, Willimowski as Volksdeutscher re-took German citizenship, like the majority of the inhabitants of the Eastern part of Upper Silesia, among them all the players of the Polish national team coming from this region. It allowed them to continue their football careers as Poles were not permitted to participate in sports under the Nazi occupation. Wilimowski was capped a total of eight times for Germany, scoring 13 goals (1.63 per match). His last appearance for Germany was in a 5-2 victory over Slovakia in Bratislava on 22 November 1942. After this match Germany no longer played international friendlies because of the war.

 

Challenge Set-Up:

  • Load up Poland and Germany.
  • Take charge of any Polish club and sign a Polish forward who will be your new "Willimowski".
  • In Poland, you must win 5 x Lotto Ekstraklasa and win the Golden Boot twice in 7 seasons.
  • You must score more than 112 goals and better his GPG of 1.30.
  • Transfer to Germany and bring your "Willimowski" with you.
  • In Germany, you must score more than 166 goals and better his GPG of 1.20.

Bonus :

  • Willimowski scored 34 goals in 30 matches while playing for Poland and Germany so take hold of Poland national team and better his international tally of 34.
  • Get your player to score more than 4 goals in a single international match.

Rules:

  • Only SI databases.
  • No unlockables unless earned on the save.
  • No use of any editor.
  • Evidence is required via screenshot, I’d suggest posting a career for all of Vibe to follow
  • No Cheating - Reloading to avoid injuries counts as cheating.

 

LEADERBOARD

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Just now, Nucleus said:

Nice challenge mate, another reason to play in the Ekstraklasa too. Good work

Thanks mate. Just came across the history of this player so thought of turning it into a challenge. I am looking to create different challenges for Vibe to get a reason to play different leagues.

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